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Happy New Year

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Happy New Year

New Year’s Day, which according to the Gregorian calendar falls on January 1, is one of the most popular occasions around the globe. Beyond religion, ethnicity, caste and creed it is a common festivity enjoyed by all. The culmination of the long holiday season, it marks a new beginning, symbolising new hope and a fresh start.

With amazing parties and fanfare, we are all ready to welcome 2017 and leave behind the bygones. From sad memories to shocking incidents, from heartbreaks to failures – there is a belief that we will slip into the coming year with replenished soul and vigour. To conquer the best and defeat the worst.

Around the world to mark the new year there are many unusual traditions that people follow. While in Latin American countries believes something as bizarre as the colour of your underwear may affect the coming year, British folklores believe sweeping your house of the New Year’s day will sweep away all the good luck out of the door!

No matter what you choose to believe and follow, everyone just hopes the next year is always happier and better than the last one.

We wish you, your loved ones and friends a very Happy New Year 2017!

 

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Elizabeth Dilts

is currently pursuing a masters at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Dilts came to New York City from Shanghai, China, where she worked as an editor with the English-language City Weekend magazine. Prior to that, Dilts spent a year in Nanjing, China, with a bilingual, Mandarin-English magazine and a stint in Tianjin, China, with a business publication. Looking to use her Mandarin back in the United States, Dilts is covering Flushing, Queens, one of New York’s four Chinatowns. A native of Gary, Indiana., Dilts received her bachelor’s degree in journalism at Indiana University. While in China, she reported on Internet usage among young adults and the education issues faced by multi-ethnic children raised in China.