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International Women’s Day

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Women's strike.

Senator Gustavo Rivera (D-Bronx) today, honored the women of New York whose historic leadership and fight for equal rights and rights of women workers we commemorate each year on International Day of the Women, March 8, and Women’s History Month.

The International Day of the Woman and Women’s History Month serve as an opportunity to remember the struggle of New York City women garment workers in the early 1900s and their fight for basic rights such as the right to vote and the right to workplace safety standards as well as a living wage and shorter work days.
 
“As we face attacks on the rights of workers throughout this country to collectively bargain, it is important that we remember not just how women have shaped our culture and society, but how women have historically fought for the rights of all workers and have shaped our history, the labor movement and our ideas of justice as well as civil and economic rights,” stated Senator Rivera. “Public sector employees and those who are have gone into teaching, a field historically occupied by women, are fighting for the rights they negotiated through collective bargaining and being wrongly blamed for budget crises during difficult economic times. I hope we take this day and the month of March to remember our history – to remember the important battles workers have fought and won that have our country great and to honor the crucial role women have played as leaders in fighting these battles and improving the lives of workers and people throughout the world.”
 
On March 8, 1908, now known as International Day of the Woman, more than 15,000 women garment workers marched through New York City’s Lower East Side, demanding political rights and economic rights as citizens and workers. Inspiring women throughout the world, women garment workers, many of them immigrants, staged a three-month strike, demanding shorter hours, better pay and voting rights.

Years later, on March 25, 1911, 146 garment workers were killed by an industrial accident and fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in Lower Manhattan, where women garment workers died because managers had locked all the doors to the stairwells and exits, making it impossible to escape. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire led to improved safety standards for workers and led to the creation of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union. These events are remembered annually during Women’s History Month.

National Women’s History Month has been officially celebrated in the month of March since 1987. For information and local Women’s History Month events please go here.

 

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Peter Treadway, PhD

is an independent consultant and money manager and Adjunct Professor in Asia. He is currently is principal of Historical Analytics, LLC. Historical Analytics is a consulting/investment management firm dedicated to global portfolio management. Its investment approach is based on Dr. Treadway’s combined top-down and bottom-up Wall Street experience as economist, strategist and securities analyst. A monthly letter entitled The Dismal Optimist is produced for clients. Dr. Treadway also serves in a part time capacity as Chief Economist, C T RISKS, a new Hong Kong company that will assist Asian financial institutions with their risk management problems. On the educational front, Dr. Treadway has developed a special Masters level course focusing on securities analysis and discounted cash flow and incorporating elements of standard equilibrium pricing models, behavioral finance and historical trends. This course has been given as Adjunct Professor at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SUFE) and the City University of Hong Kong. From 1965-2000 Dr. Treadway had a distinguished career on Wall Street and with major American financial institutions. For example, from 1978-1981 he served as Chief Economist at Fannie Mae. From 1985-1998 he served as institutional equity analyst and Managing Director at Smith Barney following savings and loans and government sponsored entities(GSEs). He was ranked as “all star” analyst eleven times by Institutional Investor Magazine. Dr. Treadway holds a PhD in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an MBA from New York University and a BA in English from Fordham University in Bronx, New York.