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Soils Versus Sea Beds

There is a new debate in paleontology, one that took me by surprise but that shows nicely how some science works. There is a particular type of ancient fossil called the “Ediacara fauna” found in rocks about 550 million years old.

Rocks From The Moon And Mars

I think the most memorable single day of all my years as a student was the afternoon I got to examine Moon rocks in graduate school....
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The Hardest Wheat Turned Soft By Science

Eighty years ago my mother was in grade school where schoolroom paste was made by mixing a little flour and water together. Memories of that simple glue came back to her when she and I recently stood in my kitchen, mixing two small batches of flour and water....
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A Vital Need

A few weeks ago I lost the use of my toilet and learned first hand just how much I missed it when it wasn’t there....
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Our Daily Bread In 2050

These are the good times....
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Sometimes Mother Nature Doubles Down On Death

Not too long ago I rewrote my will, bringing it up to date. There’s nothing like tackling a project like that to remind me of my mortality. But imagine not just your own individual death, but the finality of the death of all members of your species – that’s the idea behind what geologists and paleontologists investigate when they muse on extinctions and what can cause them....
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Getting More Out Of Each Gallon Of Gasoline

It’s commonplace to observe that we live in very partisan times. Red versus blue factions dominate our public discussions, and there often seems very little room made for agreement in the middle....
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A Salty Tomb Within An Underground Crystal

The next time you have a saltshaker handy, you might want to remove a few grains. If you have a simple magnifying glass, you’ll see the salt is really tiny cubes. Salt is a mineral and each grain is a well-formed crystal that breaks into cubic shapes....
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A Salty Tomb Within An Underground Crystal

The next time you have a saltshaker handy, you might want to remove a few grains. If you have a simple magnifying glass, you’ll see the salt is really tiny cubes. Salt is a mineral and each grain is a well-formed crystal that breaks into cubic shapes....
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Keeping Potatoes Happy & Healthy

The next time you eat a baked spud you might want to think of the agricultural scientists who are hard at work trying to help the humble potato deal successfully with some significant diseases....
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Ancient Plants Make A Comeback

The Ice Age is my favorite bit of Earth history, a time when mammoths, giant beavers and saber tooth tigers roamed the world....
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Looking Good In Black

I have never met Ryan Carney of Brown University, but he is my kind of man. On his arm he has tattooed the image of a feather of the dino-bird known as Archaeopteryx....
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Cookie Cutter Science

One of the best parts of baking for me as a kid was the process of “helping” my mama roll out and cut cookie shapes for the oven. At this age I know that I actually hindered her work and she was just being kind in letting me participate, but at the time I thought I was an aide in the process of transforming a lump of material into a thin sheet of ginger-rich dough that we could cut up into the barnyard animals of which I was so fond – and for which we had many different cutter shapes....
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Rats Are Decent Little Souls

The more we learn about animals, the more complex and interesting is the behavior they exhibit. My faithful mutt-from-the-pound, a dog named Buster Brown, impresses me from time to time with complex behaviors aimed at getting what he wants out of me. Most people who live with animals can tell you a tale or two of diabolical ­– or thoughtful – animal behavior they’ve witnessed....
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Many Pre-Irene UFO Sightings In Bronx

Hours before Hurricane Irene made landfall in New York City, a multitude of triangular shaped lights were witnessed by dozens in the sky above Bronx....
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Latin American Blueberries Called "Superfruit"

While nutritionists have long touted the health benefits of eating antioxidant-rich blueberries, new research at Lehman College in Bronx indicates a form of the fruit grown in Central and South America has earned the title “superfruit.”...
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Yuri Gagarin, First Man In Space

YouTube is celebrating 50 years of human spaceflight with the premiere of an hour-and-a-half long video, First Orbit, that recreates, in real-time, Russian astronaut Yuri Gagarin's first 108-minute long orbit of Earth in 1961....
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IBM's Girl's Go TechKnow

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, jobs requiring science, engineering and technical training has increased 51 percent through 2008. In order to prepare the youth of our society for these careers, more than 200,000 new teachers in math and science will be needed in the next decade, according to estimates by groups such as the Business-Higher Education Forum in Washington. ...
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Hans Christian Ørsted Gets Google Doodled

Thanks to Google, hundreds of millions of people are today celebrating Hans Christian Ørsted's birthday without having much of a clue who he is … so who exactly was he? ...
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Simone Development Pushing For Biotech Boom In Bronx

Simone Healthcare Development president Guy Leibler pitched the bio-tech business on the benefits of Bronx.
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Ancient Salt Marsh In Bronx Reveals Dangerous Flooding Likely For NYC

For the past four years scientists have been working in the Bronx, taking advantage of a unique opportunity to study and research the past and future of our coastal ecosystem.

Earth's Next Epoch

I was raised in the Baptist church. As a grade school child, I memorized the books of the Bible. Maybe because of that personal history, when I started to study geology I didn't resist memorizing the many pieces of the geologic time scale.

Let The Sun Shine In

My scientific training tells me that the days are getting a little bit longer now. And I do believe that. But my spirits say it remains dark awfully long into the morning and the sun surely sets early in the afternoon.

All That Glitters Is Not (Pure) Gold

Recently I had the pleasure of going to the wedding celebration of my assistant at work - whom I count as a good friend - and her new husband.

Keeping Warm With Gold Fever

I own a couple of small gold nuggets. They came from the Round Mountain gold mine in Nevada, which I visited a few years ago. A tour of the open-pit mine was crowned by a visit to their foundry where the molten metal was poured into gold bars.

Seas On Titan & Your Heating Bill

Like most regions of the country, the area where I live suffered through colder than average temperatures in mid-November. If you pay for your heating bill month by month, you are now facing the sticker shock that results from those bitter times. Happy holidays.

Harvesting Energy From Sunlight

What if there were a two-for-one sale on kilowatts? Your power bill would be cut in half -- not a bad result for your monthly budget.

Wake Up And Smell The Genes

Like millions of Americans, my day starts by plugging in the coffeepot. In my case, it is an old fashion percolator. It clears its throat and brews my coffee while I rub sleep out of my eyes and brush my teeth.

How Much Does It Hurt?

When I take my elderly mother to the emergency room, the nurse asks how much pain she is in, on a scale of 1 to 10. There is a chart with pictures of little smiley faces, neutral faces, and grimacing faces to help a person - perhaps a child - determine a number. Pain management is an important part of human medicine.

Featured Author
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Geoffrey Gloak

may be one of the few people you meet who is always glad to talk taxes. He has spent 17 years immersed in government communications – almost entirely in the tax field. He currently serves as the Director of Public Relations at the New York State Tax Department. In each of Geoff’s positions, he has created opportunities to transform the communications environment for the benefit of the organization. Under his leadership, Tax Department public relations have shifted from a reactive focus to proactive outreach. Most recently, Geoff led the STAR Registration media campaign to assist 2 million homeowners with property tax relief while eliminating fraud. As a result of extensive press outreach, more than 300 articles were printed in daily papers alone, and broadcast media repeatedly covered the story in each corner of the state. Less than 5 months after launch, 2.3 million homeowners had registered for their property tax exemptions. Geoff (@gloak23) lives in Kinderhook with his journalist wife, Kristi Berner (@kristiberner), and 4-year-old daughter, Gemma, who is now proud to be able to write her name.