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A Light Fast Twice Per Week

It certainly sounded like a fad to me. A while ago I caught a program on public television about a medical doctor in Great Britain. Dr. Michael Mosley, like millions in both that country and in the U.S., found that in middle age he needed to lose weight and lower his blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

Have A Cup Of Joe To Help Your Eyes?

My day starts with coffee. I am too cheap to buy it by the cup from baristas, so I just brew my own Folgers by the pot. I have a cup or two as I settle into work each morning, and another cup - sometimes two - in the early afternoon. That may not be wise for a chronic insomniac like myself, but it's a lifelong habit that at this point would be quite tough to break....
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What Antibiotics May Be Doing To Us

It is astonishing to think about, but when my grandfather was born, tuberculosis was the number one cause of death in our country. Worse still, one in five children did not live to see their fifth birthday, in large part due to endemic and epidemic diseases. Today that has all changed....
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An Ancient American Woman Buried By The Sea

I need to get a cap on my front tooth redone - it has a significant chip in it. Luckily I live at a time in which dentists are in every city and town, plying their trade in ways that can help us each day....
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Designing New Food Products

Today’s snack food aisle in the grocery store contains a lot more products than when I was a kid. Back then, we mainly had potato chips and saltines, but not much more. Now there is a multitude of choices designed to help you satisfy your cravings for something crunchy....
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Seize The Day: Visit A Park

This is the time of year to get outdoors and observe Mother Nature in all her glory....
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Resurrection Ecology Revives Ancient Organism

The Michael Crichton book “Jurassic Park” and the movie based on the best-seller presented what might happen if scientists were able to clone extinct dinosaurs, bringing them back to life....
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A Tale Of Two Stoves

My elderly aunt in Canada recently came into some money. She decided - very generously - to send part of it to each of her nieces and nephews....
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High Technology Meets Fields Of Wheat

As my friends and relatives know, I am quite a dinosaur in several respects. I get a lot of my news the old fashioned way from hard copy newspapers. I still pay my bills with paper checks sent through the mail. And nothing pleases me more when I get home at night than to find I have a “snail mail” letter from an old friend who took the time to put down ideas on paper with a pen....
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From Shopping Bags To Diesel Fuel

My household accumulates quite a number of plastic shopping bags. Most come home with me from the grocery store. I use them to line the little garbage pail that sits under the kitchen sink and the wastebasket that’s in the bathroom....
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Grizzly Bear Research May Help Human Medicine

I have gained 5 pounds since last summer. My body mass index (BMI) is still fine, but I need to stop gaining to keep it that way....
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Bridging The Valley Of Death

As a child, I learned about the “valley of the shadow of death” from the twenty-third Psalm. A similar image is conjured up by economists who talk about the “valley of death.”...
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Giving Warning Of Volcanic Eruptions

I was living in eastern Washington State in May of 1980 when Mount St. Helens erupted after a massive landslide triggered by a magnitude 5.1 quake. ...
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The Total Costs Of Crude Oil

Even if I walked to work each day, I would still be indebted for my daily bread to cars and trucks....
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Air Pollution Knows No Borders

We have all seen globes in classrooms. They represent the Earth well - better than flat maps can do....
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Termites And Better Biofuels

Every time I fill my gas tank, I see the notice on the pump that explains part of the fuel I’m buying is ethanol. Ethanol is alcohol, a type of biofuel rather than fossil fuel. While biofuels can be good to promote national energy independence and possibly help with greenhouse gas emissions, the ethanol in our gasoline is made from corn....
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A Step Forward In Predicting Volcanic Eruptions

There are two main things most people would like to know about particular volcanoes: when is the next eruption and how big will that eruption be? Scientists in Iceland have taken another step forward in monitoring volcanoes to best predict when they will erupt and even warn people of the size of the coming eruption....
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Designing Better Asphalt

Dr. Haifang Wen grew up in a rural area of Shandong province, in eastern China. In his youth there were not many paved highways in the Chinese countryside....
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A Brisk Walking Pace Is Better

One of the things my mutt from the pound and I like to do together is go on long walks. Sometimes on weekends Buster Brown and I stroll at the bottom of the Snake River Canyon where dogs can be off-leash (as Mother Nature intended)....
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Chemical Stem Cell Signature

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have found a chemical "signature" in blood-forming stem cells that predicts whether patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to chemotherapy....
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Simone Development Pushing For Biotech Boom In Bronx

Simone Healthcare Development president Guy Leibler pitched the bio-tech business on the benefits of Bronx.
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Ancient Salt Marsh In Bronx Reveals Dangerous Flooding Likely For NYC

For the past four years scientists have been working in the Bronx, taking advantage of a unique opportunity to study and research the past and future of our coastal ecosystem.

Earth's Next Epoch

I was raised in the Baptist church. As a grade school child, I memorized the books of the Bible. Maybe because of that personal history, when I started to study geology I didn't resist memorizing the many pieces of the geologic time scale.

Let The Sun Shine In

My scientific training tells me that the days are getting a little bit longer now. And I do believe that. But my spirits say it remains dark awfully long into the morning and the sun surely sets early in the afternoon.

All That Glitters Is Not (Pure) Gold

Recently I had the pleasure of going to the wedding celebration of my assistant at work - whom I count as a good friend - and her new husband.

Keeping Warm With Gold Fever

I own a couple of small gold nuggets. They came from the Round Mountain gold mine in Nevada, which I visited a few years ago. A tour of the open-pit mine was crowned by a visit to their foundry where the molten metal was poured into gold bars.

Seas On Titan & Your Heating Bill

Like most regions of the country, the area where I live suffered through colder than average temperatures in mid-November. If you pay for your heating bill month by month, you are now facing the sticker shock that results from those bitter times. Happy holidays.

Harvesting Energy From Sunlight

What if there were a two-for-one sale on kilowatts? Your power bill would be cut in half -- not a bad result for your monthly budget.

Wake Up And Smell The Genes

Like millions of Americans, my day starts by plugging in the coffeepot. In my case, it is an old fashion percolator. It clears its throat and brews my coffee while I rub sleep out of my eyes and brush my teeth.

How Much Does It Hurt?

When I take my elderly mother to the emergency room, the nurse asks how much pain she is in, on a scale of 1 to 10. There is a chart with pictures of little smiley faces, neutral faces, and grimacing faces to help a person - perhaps a child - determine a number. Pain management is an important part of human medicine.

Featured Author

Benjamin Kabak

is the owner and editor of SecondAvenueSagas.com, a local NYC website, providing myriad of information related to public transportation in the city.