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City To Roll Out Enrollment Van Outside Yankee Stadium Sunday For Free Municipal ID Card Program

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The city is taking its popular municipal identification program to the streets.

Government-issued free ID cards — open to all New Yorkers regardless of immigration status — will be available Sunday at a new enrollment van parked outside Yankee Stadium in Bronx.

The city’s Mobile Command Center will be live between 11:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. at the NYCFC soccer team’s home opener.

Officials say the van — which doubles as an emergency supply vehicle — will process between 40 and 60 applications a day at sites across the five boroughs.

More than 900,000 New Yorkers have signed up for the cards, which are considered official government ID and come with benefits including free access to city cultural institutions and a 15% discount on a Citi Bike membership. All city residents over 14-years-old are eligible.

In order to protect undocumented immigrants from possible deportation under President Trump, the city no longer keeps cardholders’ personal information, like birth certificates and passports, used to verify their applications.

Such data for the hundreds of thousands of people already part of the program was set to be destroyed last December, under city law.

But a judge ordered the city not to get rid of the records after two Republican lawmakers sued to keep the documents intact.

That case is still pending.

 

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Chase Scheinbaum

is a student at the Columbia Journalism School, covering the Highbridge section of Bronx. Before coming to Columbia he worked as a staff reporter for a midsize daily newspaper in Western Massachusetts, and a freelance writer for regional magazines and a daily newspaper there.