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Monroe College Sued For Tuition

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Monroe College in Bronx, NY was founded in 1933.

Trina Thompson, 27, filed a lawsuit last week against Monroe College in Bronx Supreme Court.

She is seeking to recover $70,000 she spent on tuition to get her information technology degree.

Monroe College spokesman Gary Axelbank said Ms. Thompson's lawsuit was "completely without merit".

The ex-student, who received her degree in April, says the college's Office of Career Advancement did not provide her with the leads and career advice it had promised.

"They have not tried hard enough to help me," she wrote about the college in her lawsuit.

Her mother, Carol, said her daughter was "very angry at her situation" having "put all her faith" in her college. With her student loans coming due, the family would be saddled with more debt, the graduate's mother added.

Monroe insists it helps its graduates find jobs.

"The college prides itself on the excellent career-development support that we provide to each of our students, and this case does not deserve further consideration," its spokesperson said.

 

Subscribe to comments feed Comments (10 posted):

Maria on 08/03/2009 08:34:41
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I think the entire law suit is ridiculous. For several reasons, she just graduated and the economy is struggling. She alleges that it is the school's fault but what did she do to get a job i.e. did she try an internship or volunteer at a company to get so experience. Honestly, people are struggling every where she is just trying to get out of paying her student loans.
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John Doe on 08/03/2009 15:51:19
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I think this lawsuit is evidence of a massive social epiphany in which America's youth discovers it's been misled by the empty, yet alluring promises of an over-inflated educational system.

The hippie generation prided itself in perpetually attending college and building up America's higher education empire. Many members of the hippie generation successfully avoided the draft through their studies and eventually embedded themselves as professors and faculty members in the American Universities they empowered. The hippie generation promised its progeny that the American dream was attainable, but only with a piece of paper called a diploma. The new requirement of a baccalaureate arbitrarily constricted the job market and limited free competition. All the while, American youths were promised a future in cutting-edge and prosperous professions.

Only now is the youth discovering that this campaign was all just a massive ploy. Accordingly, the educational fallacy has left the youth indebted to a system that has arbitrarily kept it out of the job force during the youth's most productive years.

As an individual who will hold a Juris Doctorate degree next spring from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, I unfortunately have also fallen victim to the shallow depictions of a resourceful career services office, only to be faced with an ineffective administration and the pending reality of unemployment.

I fully understand that no institution can guarantee success in any field and that real achievement can only be written by luck and through individual perseverance. Metaphorically, I have always understood that an individual must "walk through the door" to succeed. What these institutions have promised, and evidently and failed to do, is open any doors. Thus, America's educational empire in many ways serves only as an obstacle to begin a productive career and its depictions of resourceful career services are frequently down-right deceptive. Accordingly, I believe that the Federal Trade Commission should begin monitoring and regulating the advertising and recruiting tactics of educational entities to ensure that the America youth is no longer surprised to learn that the diploma in their hands is only a ticket to the bread line.
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Daniel on 08/03/2009 21:38:20
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No, I agree with her, I went to Monroe, and I just graduated, and unless you actually go to the school you cannot judge, while where there OCA and the college promises us careers and jobs upon graduation, hence the phrase job placement upon graduation. They almost garauntee they will get you a job. She has every right to seek reinbursment for her loans, I applaud her. I am joining the Air Force to lighten the load of the loans I took.
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Anynomous on 08/04/2009 16:40:35
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I am sorry Daniel, but you are as idiotic as this woman thinking that everyone that graduates from any college will find a job. I graduated from college a year ago, the only reason I was able to find a job was through internships and actually searching myself and not depending on anyone else. This woman's GPA was 2.7 for goodness sake, not to mention the high unemployment rate. If you went to Monroe College the only thing I blame them for is teaching you proper English. Just like she misspelled words on her lawsuit, you too have misspelled words on your comment.
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Food for thought on 08/05/2009 00:58:41
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Seriously, Daniel? Here's the fundamental problem - this worthless individual has an ingrained sense of entitlement that likely permeates everything she does. She feels she is allowed a degree by virtue of the fact that she's paying for college and she feels she is owed a job by virtue of the fact that she completed 4 years. The sooner this dopey broad realizes that no one owes you anything, the sooner she will stop expecting things she did not truly earn. Here's the key indicator: 2.7 GPA? That's not terrible but it doesn't scream super employable go-getter. Sounds like a person who, at 27, felt under the gun to get a degree so they could stop working at the Arthur Teacher’s Fish & Chips and make more money - but they didn't necessarily have the drive or ambition to think up then pursue a real goal. Sounds like a person who heard somewhere that having a degree improves your chances of getting a higher paying job and over time mangled that statement into the following: "If I get a degree, I'll make a lot more money than I am making now."

She's a fool. A buffoon. A spoiled brat in the sense that she wants all the benefits of hard work and perseverance without actually doing all the hard work and persevering. She disgusts me and you, Daniel, ought to think more critically about what this dummy is all about.
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Timothy on 08/05/2009 05:15:51
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This woman has a case. Monroe College doesn't have much credibilty with employers because they are starting to realize that this is not a real College. They are willing to accept anyone. They need to investigate this school or just shut it down.
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Mike on 08/05/2009 19:21:09
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My first thought upon reading this is "The Military Needs IT People". Daniel, I applaud your decision to join the Air Force, which offers great benefits for tuition assistance.

Maybe instead of putting all of her faith in her college, Miss Trina could considering working for the military. It might teach her some discipline and responsibility for her own actions, as well.
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M Sanchez on 12/10/2009 23:44:12
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This lawsuit is crazy. However, I agree wit her as Monroe College Career Office is a full of lies and ridiculous staff members. I know this because I went to class there and it is so pathetic where as the dean of the career office tries to force students with pizza to come to her office just so she can look good to the college community and offer nothing to the student body.
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Evelyn on 01/27/2010 04:57:38
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I agree with Trina. When I went to ITT-Tech, I was told that I would have no trouble getting a job because they would have no trouble placing me because I was considered a "double minority". I was a woman and a minority. Well that was a lie. Everytime I went for an interview, I lost out to a male. I didn't have the skills required. ITT-Tech does not offer internships like other schools do. I think Trina is right, it is time for schools to be held accountable.
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Bricks on 02/21/2010 07:54:09
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I was thinking of sending my son to Monroe, but these comments have eliminated any chance of that happening. Monroe sounds like one of those institutions that isn't really a college and isn't purely a vocational school either. Whether they graduate from Monroe "College" or any other school, I feel sorry for any young person trying to land a job in this economy. Does this woman think their might be a reason why grads with indexes at or near 4.0 seem to land decent jobs ?
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Monroe College in Bronx, NY was founded in 1933.
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Bibi Khan

Bibi Z. Khan is a Graduate student, human and environmental activist and aspiring writer. In her spare time she enjoys writing, reading and community volunteer work.