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What You Can Do To Help Decrease Violence Against Women

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December 6th was celebrated as the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada. This was established in 1991 by the Parliament of Canada, and marks the anniversary of the murders in 1989 of 14 young women at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal. It is said that they paid the ultimate price simply because they were women.

Violence against women can come in many forms and include domestic violence or intimate partner violence, mental abuse, sexual abuse, and murder.  According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, women in the United States experience about 4.8 million intimate partner-related physical assaults and rapes every year.  It is also reported that in the United States, more than 1,181 women per year are murdered by an intimate partner… that is an average of about three women every day.

Here are 7 simple things you can do today to help decrease violence against women:

1. Educate yourself about the many forms of violence against women. Education increases the chance you will recognize abuse when you see it, which raises the likelihood of you doing something about it.

2.  Do not look the other way. Call the police if you think you see signs of abuse. It is better to err on the side of caution than to ignore the signs when you have the chance to save a life.

3. Teach your children that violence in any form is wrong, and think carefully about the things to which your children are exposed.   Remember, the risk factors for being a victim of intimate partner and sexual violence include low education, witnessing violence between parents, and childhood exposure to abuse or to attitudes accepting violence and gender inequality. Children exposed to violence may become adults who either dole out violence or accept being victims of violence.

4. Volunteer and Mentor a youth... you may be the person who teaches them not to abuse or accept being abused

5. Make use of teachable moments. Say something when inappropriate comments are made that encourages violence against women.

6. Offer your support to a woman who is going through domestic abuse.

7. Walk the walk, and show your support by joining an organization or donating to reputable anti-violence groups.

Disclaimer: The information presented is intended for educational purpose only and is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.


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Peter Treadway, PhD

is an independent consultant and money manager and Adjunct Professor in Asia. He is currently is principal of Historical Analytics, LLC. Historical Analytics is a consulting/investment management firm dedicated to global portfolio management. Its investment approach is based on Dr. Treadway’s combined top-down and bottom-up Wall Street experience as economist, strategist and securities analyst. A monthly letter entitled The Dismal Optimist is produced for clients. Dr. Treadway also serves in a part time capacity as Chief Economist, C T RISKS, a new Hong Kong company that will assist Asian financial institutions with their risk management problems. On the educational front, Dr. Treadway has developed a special Masters level course focusing on securities analysis and discounted cash flow and incorporating elements of standard equilibrium pricing models, behavioral finance and historical trends. This course has been given as Adjunct Professor at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SUFE) and the City University of Hong Kong. From 1965-2000 Dr. Treadway had a distinguished career on Wall Street and with major American financial institutions. For example, from 1978-1981 he served as Chief Economist at Fannie Mae. From 1985-1998 he served as institutional equity analyst and Managing Director at Smith Barney following savings and loans and government sponsored entities(GSEs). He was ranked as “all star” analyst eleven times by Institutional Investor Magazine. Dr. Treadway holds a PhD in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an MBA from New York University and a BA in English from Fordham University in Bronx, New York.